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Temperature Tip

How many times have you had a recipe that states the temperature in Fahrenheit but your oven only has Celsius? Thanks to Pinterest, this has happened to me more times than I can remember. But it’s not just Pinterest, many box mixes (especially cakes, cupcakes & muffins) that I’ve picked up from the supermarket list a temperature in Fahrenheit. What I find even more bizarre about this is that the rest of the instructions seem to use metric measurements, like grams & millilitres rather than imperial (which is what Fahrenheit is).

I have lost count of the number of times I have had to pull up a conversion website just to check what temperature I need to set the oven. Then one day I remembered I had an analog candy/meat thermometer that shows both Celsius & Fahrenheit. It was such lightbulb moment for me. Now I simply check my candy/meat thermometer each time I need to convert the temperature to set my oven. I have honestly used it that much that I am actually beginning to remember what some of the conversion are!

To read the thermometer, I just look for the temperature the recipe calls for, then look on the opposite side of the line & it will tell me the temperature that I need to use. In the picture above, the recipe calls for the oven to be at 350°F. Using my thermometer, I find 350 on the outside of the thermometer, for Fahrenheit. The inside numbers show Celsius. So if I line them up, it tells me that I need to set my oven to approximately 176°C.

And really does anyone ever have the temperature spot on when baking? It changes each time you open the oven door anyway!

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Heat Pack Tutorial

As I make crochet bunnies for the babies when I am invited to a baby shower, I decided I should also make something for the mum to be. In this heat pack tutorial, I show you step by step how to make one for yourself.

The design is essentially a small scale pillowcase.